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Welcome Dr. Sarah Wulkan – ND, BSc

Welcome Dr. Sarah Wulkan – ND, BSc

At the NSWC, we aim to give our patients as many options as possible for holistic and integrative health care. This past month, our team of practitioners has grown into an even bigger family, with the addition of Dr. Sarah Wulkan.

With over fifteen years of personal and professional experience in the health and fitness industry, Dr. Wulkan has helped individuals optimize their physical performance and body composition. By using the many techniques and treatments available to the Naturopathic profession, she is able to determine an effective treatment plan to reach your goals. These methods may include hormone testing, food sensitivity testing, and cortisol testing. Dr. Wulkan has also gained expertise in treating injury rehabilitation for chronic pain mangement, using tools such as acupuncture, massage, and chiropractic adjustments. Dr. Wulkan ‘s philosophy as a Naturopathic doctor is to examine all possible contributing factors to a condition, rather than simply a “one size fits all” approach.

After studying with the College of Naturopathic Physicians of British Columbia, Dr. Wulkan joined the Canadian Association of Naturopathic Doctors as well as the British Columbia Naturopathic Association.

As a proud mother of two young children, Dr. Wulkan understands the joys and challenges of balancing family, lifestyle and personal health. She aims to provide both individual and realistic health care for busy women to reach their personal health care goals. She is passionate about children and values the gentle, yet thorough approach of naturopathic medicine when treating your little ones.

Her special interests include:

  • Anti-aging and preventative care
  • Hormone balancing (menopause and perimenopause)
  • Adrenal fatigue (anxiety, depression, stress and chronic fatigue)
  • Thyroid Health
  • Digestive concerns (heart burn/reflux, IBS, constipation, diarrhea
  • Weight loss and detoxification
  • Skin conditions (acne, eczema, psoriasis, rosacea, dermatitis)
  • Women’s health (PMS, fertility, pre/postnatal care, breastfeeding support)
  • Children’s health

Outside of her professional life, Dr. Wulkan enjoys to spend her time with her family, especially near the ocean or in the mountains. She adores running, hiking and surfing and hopes to excite her patients about getting active, healthy and having fun!

Come Vacay with the NSWC Team – Andrew Lin (Acupuncturist)

Come Vacay with the NSWC Team – Andrew Lin (Acupuncturist)

For the past two weeks, our Acupuncturist, Andrew Lin, has been vacationing in Thailand! Whilst in Thailand, he was able to absorb the culture and visit popular attractions. Here’s a brief breakdown of what Andrew did:

 

To begin, Andrew visited Monkey Temple. Here he was able to feed monkeys and watch them play  [Figure 1].

Did you know: There are currently 264 known monkey species.

[Figure 1] Andrew feeding the monkeys (Monkey Temple, Thailand)
Following this, Andrew was able to free his inner-Vancouverite by kayaking through caves in Amphoe Mueang Krabi. On this tour, Andrew was able to see all the different coastal ecosystems and canyons. In Thailand, the caves are a popular tourist destination for their beautiful limestone and exotic bats. Here you can see the tour group that Andrew was with, kayaking along the coast of the Mueang Krabi District [Figure 2].

[Figure 2] Kayaking through the caves of Thailand (Amphoe Mueang Krabi , Thailand)

Next up, Andrew went to Chiang Mai, where he was able relax for the day at the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary. This sanctuary is a great place for tourists to visit the elephants as it is both ethical and sustainable. During the day, Andrew was able to play with the elephants in the water as well as wash them in mud [Figure 3].

Did you know: Mud can act as a natural sun protectant for animals like elephants or hippos.

[Figure 3] Andrew with an Elephant at the Elephant Jungle Sanctuary (Chaing Mai, Thailand)

After his day relaxing with the elephants, Andrew was able to experience some of the nightlife in Chiang Mai. In the evening, Andrew went to go see the Muay Thai fight night, where he won 5 out of 7 bets with the bartender as to whom would win each fight [Figure 4]!

[Figure 4] Andrew posing with one of the fighters at the Muay Thai fight (Chaing Mai, Thailand)

The next day, Andrew was able to attend a cooking class to make authentic Thai food. Here you can see the different dishes he made [Figure 5].

 

[Figure 5] Andrew’s authentic Thai food (Chain Mai, Thailand)

As part of his trip, Andrew made an effort to visit the “Gateway to Heaven” White Temple in Chiang Rai, otherwise known as the Wat Rong Khun. Owned by the Thai visual artist  Chalermchai Kositpipat, the White Temple was built as an art exhibition for the people of Chiang Rai and it’s visitors. It is stylized as a Buddhist Temple and features The bridge of “the cycle of rebirth”,  the Gate of Heaven, the Ubosot, and the Golden Building [Figure 6].

[Figure 6] Andrew and the various attractions at the Wat Rong Khun Temple (Chaing Rai, Thailand)

Being the main building, the Ubosot is a large white structure with fragments of mirrored glass in the walls. This building takes on many design traits of classic Thai structure, including the three tiered roof and the serpent deities whom are legended to protect the Buddhist Temples. The Ubosot is meant to convey an overall message of the wickedness in people, because of this, despite the “pure” exterior, the inside of the Ubosot features fiery colours and the grand emerald Buddha, dressed in golden robes sitting on a throne in the central hall. To reach the Ubosot, people may pass over the bridge of the “cycle of rebirth,” which  emits that to obtain happiness, a person must resist the temptations of greed and desire. These visions of greed and desire are represented in the Gate to Heaven exhibit. which is guarded by two creatures; one of death and the other of Rahu, who decides the fate of the dead. Finally, the Golden Building is the temple’s washroom area. However, it is much more than this, It symbolizes the body and people.

 

In Chiang Rai, Andrew was also able to visit the Long Neck Tribe. These women sometimes can have up to 25 of the heavy brass rings around their neck, this results in the shoulders and rib cages of the women being compressed down [Figure 7].

[Figure 7] Andrew’s visit with the Long Neck Tribe (Chaing Rai, Thailand)

Andrews final stop took him to the Golden Triangle. Known for it’s production and distribution of opium on the ghost island, the Golden Triangle is a popular tourist destination. Andrew was able to take a guided boat tour through the rivers of Thailand, Myanmar, and Laos [Figure 8].

[Figure 8] Andrew with the arch of the Golden Triangle

All Photos by: Andrew Lin

Don’t neglect your health this summer!

Don’t neglect your health this summer!

Photo by: Danielle Tabo (NSWC RMT)

The NSWC team is so glad summer has finally arrived in our wonderful city known as “Raincouver”, but the sunny weather does not excuse laziness! Most of us are very familiar with forgetting our health goals over the summer months, however, this year, plan to stay in your best state of wellness with us. Here are some of our best summer tips to keep you feeling 10/10.

1. Protect Your Skin

It’s a struggle we all have, but it’s important to remember to apply sunscreen before leaving the house. Even when its cloudy, the UV rays from the sun are extremely harmful to our skin. Skin cancer is the most popular and dangerous of all the cancers. One out of every three cancers is a form of skin caner, and almost 90% of these skin cancer’s is caused by the UV rays from the sun.

We recommend at least SPF 30!
(TIP: Try finding a daily moisturizer that works for you with SPF!)

2. Stay Hydrated

A healthy person needs 30-50 ounces of fluid each day! This remains especially true throughout the summer heat. Drinking lots of water has plenty of benefits for your body:

  • Better blood circulation – By drinking water, your body is able to pump blood to your heart more easily and therefore allows easier muscle movement.
  • Clear complexion – Water often aids in flushing any toxins out of your body, which reduces soreness.
  • Keeping cool – Due to the benefits of water, your body won’t be working so hard, therefore, you will stay cooler than if your body is trying to make up for the lack of certain health benefits.
  • Preventing Dry Mouth – Drinking lots of water, works to banish dry mouth which may be causing bad breath and even promoting cavities.

It is also good to keep in mind that caffeine and alcohol dehydrate your body. When drinking coffee, tea, or any alcoholic beverage, it is smart to match each cup of the dehydrating drink to a glass of water.

(TIP: If you don’t like plain water, try alternatives like coconut water or protein shakes to keep your hydration levels up!)

3. Meal Prep

Summer can be a busy time for most people. It is important to maintain your diet and keep nutrition levels at a high. The best way to do this, is through meal prep, which is picking a few days a week to prepare food for the upcoming days throughout the week. This will help you avoid those last minute lunch trips to a fast food restaurant.

Holistic nutritionist Lauren Paton can help you with this! Her website has great recipes, as well as she offers a great selection of services to help you with your health goals.

4. Maintain Wellness

If you’re finding that each time you feel healthy and well, it only lasts briefly, it may be because you’re not maintaining your wellness. We recommend patients book in at least once a month, for maintenance appointments here at the North Shore Wellness Centre. This will maximize your health potential and keep you feeling your best. A healthy lifestyle starts with you!

Our services include:

Chiropractic Care & ART
Acupuncture & TCM
Class IV Laser Therapy
Counselling
Homeopathy
Naturopathy
Osteopathy
Physiotherapy
Registered Massage Therapy

To book in call (604) 980-4538 or access our online booking site here

 

 

Happy (belated) Canada Day!

Happy (belated) Canada Day!

Happy Belated Canada Day, everyone!

In the spirit of celebrating our great nation, remember to celebrate yourself as well. Book in with one of our fantastic practitioners today to keep your body in it’s best shape!

We offer a wide range of services here at the North Shore Wellness Centre:
– Chiropractic Care & ART
– Acupuncture & TCM
– Class IV Laser Therapy
– Counselling
– Homeopathy
– Naturopathy
– Osteopathy
– Physiotherapy
 Registered Massage Therapy

To book in call (604) 980-4538 or access our online booking site here.

Come Vacay with the NSWC Team – Danielle Tabo (RMT)

Come Vacay with the NSWC Team – Danielle Tabo (RMT)

From June 10th to June 17th, one of our Registered Massage Therapists, Danielle Tabo visited Sedona, Arizona. Whilst she was there, Dani explored the hot desert terrain, here are a few of the hikes she went on…

[Figure 1] – Bell Rock Trail (Sedona, Arizona)
Here you can see Dani on Bell Rock, which has an elevation of 4 919 ft at it’s summit. A popular hike in Sedona… Bell Rock is located in the Central-North of Sedona and is made up of sedimentary rock [Figure 1]. At Bell Rock, Dani was able to find a Geocache journal tucked into one of the crevasses [Figure 2]. This hike is extremely popular amongst tourists for its vortexes. At Bell Rock, the vortex is of male origin; the male vortexes are known for their power to create a will for healthy boundaries in people. This is excellent for bodily healing, reduced stress, and overall energy.

[Figure 2] – Danielle Tabo (RMT) with a Geo-Cache she found in Sedona, Arizona

Dani was also lucky enough to hike the Brins Mesa Trail which reaches an elevation of 600 ft and is roughly 2.5 km in length [Figure 3].

[Figure 3] – Brins Mesa Trail (Sedona, Arizona)

On her trip, Dani was also able to take advantage of Sedona’s Jeep Tours! Recognized for it’s presence of vortices, the Jeep Tour took Dani to explore the sacred earth and medicine ground in the old earth of Sedona, Arizona [Figure 4].

[Figure 4] – Jeep Tour (Sedona, Arizona)
On her tour, Dani visited Devil’s Bridge, which is the largest natural stone arch in Sedona. It is about 1.3 km long at an elevation of 350 ft. [Figure 5] This hike is equivalent to our very own Grouse Grind in North Vancouver!

[Figure 5] – Devil’s Bridge (Sedona, Arizona)

All Photos by: Danielle Tabo

 

Summer Vacation !

Summer Vacation !

With Summer upon us, a few of our practitioners have exciting trips planned and will be away….

 

Chiropractic and ART

  • Dr. Terry Dickson: July 22nd, August 19th to 28th
  • Dr. Anita Hildebrandt: July 8th, July 15th, July 2oth to August 13th
    • Note: Dr. Hildebrandt will have Dr. Patricia Gorman as her locum whilst she is gone.

Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine

  • Andrew Lin: June 18th to July 3rd

Registered Massage Therapy

  • Danielle Tabo: June 10th to 17th,  July 7th to 10th, August 12th to 14th, August 19th to 21st
  • Kandice Leaf: August 4th to 12th, August 19th to September 7th
  • Shawn Slingerland: July 28th to August 14th, August 25th to September 4th
  • Michelle Woodruff: June 30th, July 26th to 31st, August 3rd to August 9th

Naturopathy

  • Dr. Stefanie Schlegel: May 24th to July 17th, August 2nd, August 9th, August 16th, August 23rd to September 4th

 

Acupuncture / Traditional Chinese Medicine

Acupuncture / Traditional Chinese Medicine

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has an extensive history dating back some 3000 years. In fact, TCM is the oldest continually practiced medical system in existence, and there are recorded instances of its use dating back to thousands of years before the birth of Christ.

Within the practice of TCM, there are many different modalities, and while many people often equate acupuncture with traditional Chinese medicine, this is not necessarily the case. Acupuncture is a modality within the scope of TCM, but it is really just a component, and therefore part of a much larger picture. In addition to acupuncture, TCM encompasses several other modalities, all of which are designed to assist patients to reach a relative state of health and balance. Other therapies that might be employed include moxibustion, herbal medicine, diet and lifestyle changes, and exercise (generally qi gong , or tai chi ).

The concepts of TCM can be quite complex and difficult to grasp. This difficulty lies in the problem of translation- there are some ideas that form the basis of TCM that have no adequate English translation. For example one of the main concepts is the idea of Qi (pronounced ‘chee’), which is a vital substance that nourishes every tissue, organ and cell.

Essentially, the TCM view is that we live in a universe in which everything is interconnected. As a result, what happens to one part of the body will ultimately affect every other part of the body. For this reason, the mind and body in TCM have never been viewed separately from each other, but rather as part of a complete energetic system, and the goal of a TCM practitioner is to re-establish balance and harmony within the system.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

How does a TCM practitioner determine what’s wrong with me?

Your practitioner will employ several diagnostic tools to determine what is out of balance. This begins with questioning the patient about their various signs and symptoms, previous medical history, and course of illness. Next is a physical inspection of one’s face, body, posture, and in particular the tongue and its coating. The practitioner will also palpate various body areas, and the pulse at both wrists. Finally, the sound of one’s voice, breathing, and any smells or odors will also form part of the picture. By using the combined information obtained from these diagnostic methods, the practitioner will be able to determine what is out of balance, and the appropriate treatment method(s) will be selected.

Can TCM help me?

It is estimated that 25% of the world’s population makes use of TCM therapies. In fact, traditional Chinese medicine and modern Western medicine are the two dominant medical systems in the world today. Chinese medicine is a complete medical system, with methods and treatments that can address the full range of disease: acute and chronic, traumatic, infectious, and internally generated. However, there are some cases where Chinese medicine may not be powerful enough. Conditions that are particularly far advanced or virulent, or cases of emergency or acute trauma may not be ideal for TCM. On the other hand, Chinese medicine is an ideal choice at the early stages of any disease, or for cases where modern medicine has no effective treatment.

How long will it take?

There are many factors that determine how long a person will require treatment. Generally speaking, newer or more recent problems will require fewer treatments, and chronic or older conditions will take more time. Acute injuries or conditions of acute pain will be treated with greater frequency (2-3 times per week), and chronic conditions are treated less frequently.

Do I have to keep coming back for treatment?

This is a common question, and the answer is not simple. It is recommended that you return for periodic treatments, much the same as you see your dentist. This allows your practitioner to help you maintain a desired state of health. This notion of preventative medical care is one that we at North Shore Wellness Centre consider extremely important, and we try to educate all of our patients as to the importance of regular care.

Is Chinese medicine safe?

In British Columbia, practitioners are governed the College of Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists of British Columbia ( www.ctcma.bc.ca ). This is the regulating body of TCM in the province, and it is your assurance of competent, quality practitioners. When practiced correctly, TCM will have no side effects, and is extremely safe. The North Shore Wellness Centre uses individually packaged, sterile, disposable needles so there is virtually no chance of infection.

Is acupuncture painful?

An acupuncture needle is extremely thin, and their insertion is virtually painless. Some needling sites will produce very little sensation, and you may not even know the needles are in place. Other sites may produce a sensation of tingling, electricity, heat, cold, heaviness, or an achy sensation. There may also be a sensation of qi moving up or down the channels. The vast majority of people find acupuncture to be extremely relaxing, and many will even fall asleep during treatment.

Myth:

“Chinese medicine is a system of folk healing.”

Not true. Chinese medicine has been developed by some of the sharpest minds in Chinese history, and there are more than 40,000 books and pieces of literature on Chinese medicine. Studies are routinely conducted in Mainland China, and new developments in the field of Chinese medicine are common.

Safety

The practice of traditional Chinese medicine is extremely safe when performed by a competent, registered practitioner. There are currently four professional designations that pertain to the practice of Chinese medicine in BC, these are:

• R.Ac (Registered Acupuncturist)

• R.TCM.H (Registered TCM Herbalist)

• R.TCM.P (Registered TCM Practitioner)

• Dr. TCM

For more information, see the College website at www.ctcma.bc.ca.

Education

Educational requirements vary according to the professional designation of the practitioner. For example, the Dr.TCM requires five years of school at a TCM college, and two years of undergrad studies for a total of seven years.

Licensing

All the information regarding licensing of practitioners is available on the College website at www.ctcma.bc.ca

Recent Studies

As traditional Chinese medicine, and acupuncture gains more popularity in the West, an increasing number of studies are being conducted in order to determine the effects of acupuncture from a modern biomedical perspective. Following is a summary of a recent study conducted by the Harvard Medical School. (Source: www.hsibaltimore.com). .

A team of researchers from the Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts General Hospital conducted a study to investigate the physiological responses in the body during an acupuncture treatment. In the study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used in order to determine changes in blood flow, as well as fluctuations in blood oxygen that occurred during acupuncture treatments.

The study consisted of stimulation of needles on a specific acupuncture point on the hand in 13 healthy subjects. Based on fMRI analysis, a clear change in the brain of 11 of the 13 subjects was observed. Researchers noted a decrease in blood flow to the regions of the brain associated with pain, mood, and cravings.

Bruce Rosen, a Harvard Medical School radiologist said that the regions of the brain affected in the test are especially susceptible to dopamine, which he described as a “reward chemical”. He further speculated that the dopamine activity triggers the release of endorphins, which are pain relief chemicals in the body.

Of course, as one neurobiologist suggested, the next step should be a controlled study to compare fMRI results of “genuine” acupuncture versus the stimulation of “bogus” points. However, this study does provide some important information in understanding the physiological activity in the body during an acupuncture treatment.

Chiropractic Services

Chiropractic Services

What is Chiropractic care?

Chiropractors focus on the health of the joints of the body, particularly the spine. Through a variety of hands on tests, the chiropractor will determine which areas are not moving as well as they should, how this is affecting the overall function of the body, and if an irritation of the nerves is involved. The main tool chiropractors use to correct this is the adjustment, or spinal manipulation. There are other soft tissue techniques that Chiropractors may choose instead of manipulation, such as Active Release Technique and Trigenics. Your doctor will determine which type of chiropractic adjustment, or treatment, is suitable for you based on your condition, your age, your bone health, and your personal preference. The goal of the adjustment is to decrease pain, increase function, and get you moving and feeling your best. Your chiropractor may also recommend exercises, stretches, or modifications to your lifestyle that will enhance your long term health.

All patients are taken through an initial health history and thorough physical examination. A complete diagnosis will be given and treatment options will be discussed. We believe in each and every patient taking an active role in their recovery through implementing a customized exercise and stretching rehabilitation program. We pride ourselves on fully explaining your injury to improve your understanding of your body and overall health.

What comprises a Doctor of Chiropractic Degree?

Chiropractors are regulated, primary health care practitioners who have undergone over 4500 hours of academic and clinical education at a nationally accredited chiropractic college, after having completed at least 3 years of an undergraduate, university education. Most Chiropractors obtain an undergraduate degree before entering chiropractic college.

How do Chiropractors treat?

Chiropractic takes a manual approach to health care through the assessment, diagnosis, treatment and subsequent prevention of conditions relating to the neurological, muscular and skeletal systems of the body. All assessments and treatments are typically hands-on.

What do Chiropractors treat?

Chiropractors can successfully treat conditions that range from chronic postural dysfunctions and repetitive strain injuries, to acute joint irritations, sprains and strains. Although most people think of their spine being treated by chiropractors, all of the joints and muscles of the body are able to be treated by these health professionals. In fact, the majority of conditions relating to the musculoskeletal system can be positively managed to some degree via chiropractic care.

Health Gains for Grown Up Soccer Players

Health Gains for Grown Up Soccer Players

Being a soccer mom usually means carpooling kids to games and watching them play. But new research shows that women who join in the fun and kick around a soccer ball can dramatically improve their bone and heart health.

Researchers in Denmark recruited more than 70 women ages 20 to 47 who had no history of playing soccer as children or teenagers. Two-thirds of the women were randomly assigned to either a running group or a soccer team. The rest served as a control group.

For 14 weeks, the women in the active groups exercised by running or playing soccer for an hour a day just two days a week.

At the end of the study period, women in both exercise groups had improved on a number of indicators of heart health, balance and muscle strength, compared with the control group. However, the gains were greater among the women who had played soccer instead of running.

For instance, runners improved their maximum oxygen uptake, an indicator of cardiovascular fitness, by about 10 percent. But the soccer players improved by 15 percent.

And playing soccer not only led to better balance and improved muscle strength, but the sport also increased a woman’s bone mineral density by an average of 2 to 3 percent. Given that after age 40 women lose bone mass at the rate of about .5 to 1 percent a year, the gains from soccer are equivalent to reversing three to six years of bone aging, according to the report published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports.

Why was soccer so much better for a woman’s bones and heart? Peter Krustrup, associate professor of exercise physiology at the University of Copenhagen, said that soccer gave women a more diverse workout than running.

“We analyzed the activity patterns during soccer, and we observed multiple sprints, turns, tackles, headers and shots on goal,” he said.  The researchers speculate that the varied activity patterns were more stimulating to bones than simply jogging or running at a steady pace.

Other studies conducted by Dr. Krustrup and colleagues have shown similar heart and bone benefits in male soccer players. One study looked at muscle function and balance in a group of 65- to 75-year-old men who played recreational soccer most of their lives. In a one-leg balance test, the older soccer players performed just as well as 30-year-old men. Older men who weren’t trained in soccer had twice as many falls during the balance test as their soccer-playing peers.

While many people associate soccer with broken bones and muscle injuries, the injury risk among the recreational soccer players studied was low. Although the women kept score and were competitive when they played, the intensity level of the game was far lower than in games played in high school, college or sports clubs.

“When you play soccer in the park or among friends, the injury risk is much much lower than if you play competitive games with local rivals from another club,” Dr. Krustrup said.

Dr. Krustrup said that although many adults think their only exercise options are jogging or joining a gym, the study shows the value of recreational team sports.

“We know a lot about strength training, running and cycling because those sports are very easy to study in the laboratory,” Dr. Krustrup said. “But so many people all over the world play soccer, basketball or hockey. It’s very important to understand the health benefits of those sports and to emphasize that there are motivational and social factors related to team sports that may enhance the possibility for lifelong adherence to a physically active lifestyle.”

Article posted from http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/03/04/health-gains-for-grownup-soccer-players/